If you liked your plan but can't keep it...

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Dean Griffin liked the health insurance he purchased for himself and his wife three years ago and thought he'd be able to keep the plan even after the federal Affordable Care Act took effect.



But the 64-year-old recently received a letter notifying him the plan was being canceled because it didn't cover certain benefits required under the law.



The Griffins, who live near Philadelphia, pay $770 monthly for their soon-to-be-terminated health care plan with a $2,500 deductible.



The cheapest plan they found on their state insurance exchange was a so-called bronze plan charging a $1,275 monthly premium with deductibles totaling $12,700. It covers only providers in Pennsylvania, so the couple, who live near Delaware, won't be able to see doctors they've used for more than a decade.


"We're buying insurance that we will never use and can't possibly ever benefit from. We're basically passing on a benefit to other people who are not otherwise able to buy basic insurance," said Griffin, who is retired.


The Griffins are among millions of people nationwide who buy individual insurance policies and are receiving notices that those policies are being discontinued.


They can buy different policies directly from insurers for 2014 or sign up for plans on state insurance exchanges.


While lower-income people could see lower costs because of government subsidies, many in the middle class may get rude awakenings when they access the websites and realize they'll have to pay significantly more.




http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/sticker-shock-insurance-cancellation-20764181
 
I'm sure his subsidies will make his plan very affordable, for the less than one year that he'll need it before his Medicare kicks in.

Thanks Obama!
 
I'm sure his subsidies will make his plan very affordable, for the less than one year that he'll need it before his Medicare kicks in. Thanks Obama!

What subsidies?


Those not eligible for subsidies generally receive more comprehensive coverage than they had under their soon-to-be-canceled policies, but they'll have to pay a lot more.


Because of the higher cost, the Griffins are considering paying the federal penalty — about $100 or 1 percent of income next year — rather than buying health insurance. They say they are healthy and don't typically run up large health care costs.


Dean Griffin said that will be cheaper because it's unlikely they will get past the nearly $13,000 deductible for the coverage to kick in.


Individual health insurance policies are being canceled because the Affordable Care Act requires plans to cover certain benefits, such as maternity care, hospital visits and mental illness.


In the past, consumers could get relatively inexpensive, bare-bones coverage, but those plans will no longer be available.


Many consumers are frustrated by what they call forced upgrades as they're pushed into plans with coverage options they don't necessarily want.


http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/sticker-shock-insurance-cancellation-20764181
 
What subsidies?


Those not eligible for subsidies generally receive more comprehensive coverage than they had under their soon-to-be-canceled policies, but they'll have to pay a lot more.


Because of the higher cost, the Griffins are considering paying the federal penalty — about $100 or 1 percent of income next year — rather than buying health insurance. They say they are healthy and don't typically run up large health care costs.


Dean Griffin said that will be cheaper because it's unlikely they will get past the nearly $13,000 deductible for the coverage to kick in.


Individual health insurance policies are being canceled because the Affordable Care Act requires plans to cover certain benefits, such as maternity care, hospital visits and mental illness.


In the past, consumers could get relatively inexpensive, bare-bones coverage, but those plans will no longer be available.


Many consumers are frustrated by what they call forced upgrades as they're pushed into plans with coverage options they don't necessarily want.


http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/sticker-shock-insurance-cancellation-20764181
He's retired. If he doesn't qualify for a subsidy, then he can surely afford supplemental coverage, as he'll be getting Medicare in less than 1 year.
 
He's retired. If he doesn't qualify for a subsidy, then he can surely afford supplemental coverage, as he'll be getting Medicare in less than 1 year.

Nice. You get to decide what he can afford?

Did you read what the man said?
 
Americans who face higher *insurance costs under President Obama’s health-care law are angrily complaining about “sticker shock,” threatening to become a new political force opposing the law even as the White House struggles to convince other consumers that they will benefit from it.


The growing backlash involves people whose plans are being discontinued because the policies don’t meet the law’s more-stringent standards.


They’re finding that many alternative policies come with higher premiums and deductibles.


After receiving a letter from her insurer that her plan was being discontinued, Deborah Persico, a 58-year-old lawyer in the District, found a comparable plan on the city’s new health insurance exchange.


But her monthly premium, now $297, would be $165 higher, and her maximum out-of-pocket costs would double.


That means she could end up paying at least $5,000 more a year than she does now. Said Persico, who represents indigent criminal defendants. “This is ridiculous.”


If the poor, sick and uninsured are the winners under the Affordable Care Act, the losers appear to include some relatively healthy middle-income small-business owners, consultants, lawyers and other self-employed workers who buy their own insurance.


Many make too much to qualify for new federal subsidies provided by the law but not enough to absorb the rising costs without hardship.


Some are too old to go without insurance because they have children or have minor health issues, but they are too young for Medicare.



http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/for-consumers-whose-health-premiums-will-go-up-under-new-law-sticker-shock-leads-to-anger/2013/11/03/d858dd28-44a9-11e3-b6f8-3782ff6cb769_story.html
 
He's retired. If he doesn't qualify for a subsidy, then he can surely afford supplemental coverage, as he'll be getting Medicare in less than 1 year.

its all good.....he can surely afford to pay more, it doesn't matter than he only has to pay more because Democrats remain committed to their primary platform, "Take".....
 
a few months ago you could take it for granted, simply based on the fact he was unhappy with Obamacare......now, it's less certain......even Democrats are unhappy with it now.....


The disruptions being caused by the new law have been especially jolting for those who support the ideals of the health-care overhaul.


Marlys Dietrick, a 60-year-old artist from San Antonio, said she had high hopes that the new law would help many of her friends who are chefs, actors or photographers get insured.


“I am one of those Democrats who wanted it to be better,” she said.


But she said they have been turned off by high premiums and deductibles and would rather pay the fine.


Her insurer, Humana, informed her that her plan was being canceled and that the rate for herself and her 21-year-old son for a plan compliant with the new law would rise from $300 to $705.


On the federal Web site, she found a comparable plan for $623 a month. Because her annual income is about $80,000, she doesn’t qualify for subsidies.


A cheaper alternative on the federal exchange, she said, had a premium of $490 a month — but it was an HMO plan rather than the PPO plan she currently has. “I wouldn’t be able to go to the doctor I’ve been going to for years,” she said. “That is not a deal.”


And both the HMO and PPO exchange plans she examined had family deductibles of $12,700, compared with her current $7,000.


http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/for-consumers-whose-health-premiums-will-go-up-under-new-law-sticker-shock-leads-to-anger/2013/11/03/d858dd28-44a9-11e3-b6f8-3782ff6cb769_story_1.html
 
Listen to all the cheers he gets.

that is a room full of fucking cheating scum bags.

EVERYONE of them a republican
 
why does your party have to CHEAT to win elections?


not being elected by the people is to you greatness?


cheating is greatness?


fuck you pack of traitors
 
so court documentation and direct video of you fucks talking about cheating in elections is not real information?
 
He's retired. If he doesn't qualify for a subsidy, then he can surely afford supplemental coverage, as he'll be getting Medicare in less than 1 year.
What about his wife? The story didn't say she was also 64. Average age difference in married couples in the U.S. is 3.5 years, with the woman usually the younger. Their problems don't end next year. Also, Medicare is also scheduled to increase under the ACA, as are the various Medicare supplemental coverages.

The ACA is just one more battle in the war against the middle class and small business.
 
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