1% Of Those That Got Through Exchanges Are Enrolled

Annie

Not So Junior Member
Worse yet, many may think they've got coverage after January:

http://www.cnbc.com/id/101087965#_gus

99% of Obamacare applications hit a wall
Published: Friday, 4 Oct 2013
By: Dan Mangan | Health Care Reporter

It's a batting average that won't land the federal marketplace for Obamacare into the Healthcare Hall of Fame.

As few as 1 in 100 applications on the federal exchange contains enough information to enroll the applicant in a plan, several insurance industry sources told CNBC on Friday. Some of the problems involve how the exchange's software collects and verifies an applicant's data.

"It is extraordinary that these systems weren't ready," said Sumit Nijhawan, CEO of Infogix, which handles data integrity issues for major insurers including WellPoint and Cigna, as well as multiple Blue Cross Blue Shield affiliates.

Experts said that if Healthcare.gov's success rate doesn't improve within the next month or so, federal officials could face a situation in January in which relatively large numbers of people believe they have coverage starting that month, but whose enrollment applications are have not been processed.

"It could be public relations nightmare," said Nijhawan. Insurers have told his company that just "1 in 100" enrollment applicants being sent from the federal marketplace have provided sufficient, verified information.


Batches 'corrupted'

One insurer reported a better, but still stunningly low, rate of enrollment applications containing enough data to process for coverage.

"It's about half of what we've received," a source at that insurer said.

"We're getting incomplete data—about half of the applications we haven't been able to process," said the source, who used the term "corrupted" to describe the batch of applications received.

That means the people in every batch who haven't provided enough or correct information must be contacted for additional data to ensure they qualify for the insurance they want to buy, experts said. The federal exchange itself may have to seek that data from enrollees.

And that extra work could significantly burden a system already bogged down by high numbers of people trying to view prices and enrollment forms on Healthcare.gov.


A spokeswoman for the Department of Health and Human Services declined to comment directly on the revelations Friday afternoon.

However, in a press release, HHS said it that "traffic on the website and at the call center continues to be high" with 8.6 million unique web visitors since Tuesday, and that "two-thirds" of those visitors "accessed the marketplace to begin their application and shop for plans."

"To make further improvements to the system, we will be taking down the application part of the website for scheduled maintenance during off-peak hours over the weekend," the release said. "The enhancements we are making will enable more simultaneous users to successfully create an account and move through the application and plan shopping process."

Infogix Chief Product Officer Bobby Koritala and others said Friday that the problem appears to be limited to Healthcare.gov, which is handling plans for people in 36 states, not the exchanges being operated individually by the 14 other states and the District of Columbia.

"One hundred people submit their application, one of them goes all the way through the processing ... a big chunk of them are being held," Koritala said. "They need to get more clarifying information."

He blamed the exchange's software, which is allowing too many people to finish the process online without making sure they provide answers needed by the insurers processing the applications.

Koritala said his team has been told by insurers that "some issues are around data quality issues, such as specific IDs associated with enrollees [and] address issues such as state name abbreviations."

'Not a traffic issue'

"It doesn't surprise me—I've heard similar numbers," said Dan Mendelson, CEO of consulting firm Avalere Health, when asked about the 1-in-100 rate that Infogix cited.

"This is not a traffic issue," Mendelson said. "Right now, the systems aren't working."

Mendelson and Koritala were both optimistic that the federal marketplace could make software adjustments to reduce the number of deficient applications being transmitted to insurers, and reduce the time and effort expended getting back to applicants.

Beating the wave

But, Mendelson warned, "I'm going to say they have one month to get their act together on the IT" to reduce the lag in verifying and finalizing applications. If that doesn't happen, the government could "potentially increase the length of the enrollment period."

People have until Dec. 15 to enroll and pay for a plan to be effective Jan. 1. The enrollment deadline for 2014 is March 31.

Mendelson's one-month time frame reflects a wave of enrollment expected in late November as people try to beat the cutoff.

"If we continue to see these issues through the next three or four weeks there's a lot of concern about how many people will have effective coverage by Jan. 1," said Dan Schuyler, director of the consultancy Leavitt Partners.

Though he had not heard about the specific problem of insurers' getting large numbers of applications with missing or questionable data, he said that right up until Tuesday's launch of the exchanges, he heard about difficulties with test transmissions to insurers.

Specifically, Schuyler said, insurers selling plans on the exchange were not receiving data about all individuals supposedly enrolling in those plans during the tests being conducted.

In its press release Friday, HHS said, "Experts are working around the clock to make the site better able to meet the volume created by consumers' overwhelming interest in their new health coverage options."

"There have been sustained improvements to the consumer experience and that trend is expected to continue."

Experts said that if the lag in processing enrollments continues on a large scale, insurers expect the federal government to tell them that they must provide benefits to people even as applications are still being processed.

"In talking to some of the insurers, they pretty much assume that even if there are issues, the feds will say, 'You know what, it's your problem, they've signed up,' " said Koritala.
 
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The primary problem is that people are going to the healthcare.gov site when their particular enrollment exchanges are within their particular states. One thing is for certain. The interest in and demand for enrollment in Obamacare is dramatically exceeding the expectations of EVERYONE. When the dust settles this will be made more clear for you, annie. The American people have been demanding this or something like this for over one hundred years, since Teddy Roosevelt. Most of us are very relieved at this point and very much welcome this opportunity to increase the value of our nation, our public infrastructure, our society and our collective health. It's the American way.

Petula
 
The primary problem is that people are going to the healthcare.gov site when their particular enrollment exchanges are within their particular states. One thing is for certain. The interest in and demand for enrollment in Obamacare is dramatically exceeding the expectations of EVERYONE.

Bullshit.


By Wednesday afternoon, seven state-based exchanges seemed to be fully functional, while D.C.’s exchange, seven other state exchanges, and all 36 exchanges that relied on the federal government’s system weren’t working...

It's the same story for the Affordable Care Act's new health insurance exchange websites: Four days after they were supposed to be up and running, most of them still weren't working as of Friday afternoon.

While website readiness has improved a bit across the week—during Tuesday's launch, every site was down or error-plagued at some point—long load times and other site glitches still plagued nearly all of the new health insurance exchange websites across Friday.


http://www.advisory.com/Daily-Briefing/Blog/2013/10/42-state-exchanges-still-having-problems
 
Blah, blah, blah. I've had trouble getting onto the IBM site from time to time. Hewlett Packard, too!!!! All things in good time!!!!!!! Quit sucking on your finger and stick it back in your butt where you had it.

Petula
 
Blah, blah, blah. I've had trouble getting onto the IBM site from time to time. Hewlett Packard, too!!!! All things in good time!!!!!!! Quit sucking on your finger and stick it back in your butt where you had it. Petula

Liberals lie all the time, Petulant.

I'll bet if an online process was this fucked up under a Republican administration you and your oh-so mellow fellows would be exhibiting zero tolerance.
 
Millions of young teabaggers and liberals will sign up. You lost 2 elections on this issue Looks like teabaggers want a threepeat

Remind me, didn't David Vitter and Bobby Jindal get elected to the Senate and Governors' office in Loseriana?
 
LOL, the odds are against that, aren't they?

Where does Loseriana rank in income?

It's a Southern red state.....so obviously they rank low in income....just like the rest of the deep south. Alabama, Mississippi....all the same....ignorant, poor and voting for whatever the baggers throw at them....all they have to do is use the word freedom a lot and the citizenry eats it up.
 
Actually we rank average for the USA
Way above alabubba, miss

Surprising. I lived in Central Louisiana for a year and still have relatives who live there. Seemed pretty poor to me. Of course, I lived there in the 80's....so things obviously have changed.
 
Bigteabagger - military, irs, social security, fire dept, your paycheck the welfare dept

???....which private sector entities are you comparing them to?.......I don't seem to recall a private sector IRS, but if there were, I bet it would run better than the federal version......
 
The primary problem is that people are going to the healthcare.gov site when their particular enrollment exchanges are within their particular states. One thing is for certain. The interest in and demand for enrollment in Obamacare is dramatically exceeding the expectations of EVERYONE. When the dust settles this will be made more clear for you, annie. The American people have been demanding this or something like this for over one hundred years, since Teddy Roosevelt. Most of us are very relieved at this point and very much welcome this opportunity to increase the value of our nation, our public infrastructure, our society and our collective health. It's the American way.

Petula
And...there's no way to discern how many of those applications were purposely left incomplete? If nobody here believes that there are monied interests attempting to crash this system, then there's no hope for those fools.
Yes...the smoke will clear, people will realize that they don't have to sign up online, and the system will move forward.

With, or without the teabaggers.
 
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