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Thread: Hunter-gatherer Temples

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    Default Hunter-gatherer Temples

    Natufian villages predate agriculture by 5000 years. Humans were building stone structures to gather for worship and festivals at least 15,000 years ago. That required separate villages to cooperate for a common goal. There had to be a strong and knowledgeable leader to convince these villages to work together. Woolly mammoths and saber-toothed tigers were still roaming the earth.

    The only evidence of trade is human nature. We're always looking for a way to make life easier, so our first stone temples were also a place for commerce, or do I have it backwards? Either way people came from all over to feast and trade at a church. There was no controlling centralized government forcing people to do what we've always done. Systemic collapse may be the cure we need.

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    Quote Originally Posted by goat View Post
    Natufian villages predate agriculture by 5000 years. Humans were building stone structures to gather for worship and festivals at least 15,000 years ago. That required separate villages to cooperate for a common goal. There had to be a strong and knowledgeable leader to convince these villages to work together. Woolly mammoths and saber-toothed tigers were still roaming the earth.

    The only evidence of trade is human nature. We're always looking for a way to make life easier, so our first stone temples were also a place for commerce, or do I have it backwards? Either way people came from all over to feast and trade at a church. There was no controlling centralized government forcing people to do what we've always done. Systemic collapse may be the cure we need.
    You go on without me. I'm not in favor of living a Stone Age existence. Dying from an infected wound or during childbirth is not nearly as romantic as it sounds.
    “Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.” -- Gandhi

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    Quote Originally Posted by ThatOwlWoman View Post
    You go on without me. I'm not in favor of living a Stone Age existence. Dying from an infected wound or during childbirth is not nearly as romantic as it sounds.
    Science is slowly accepting the fact that civilization predates agriculture. We now know that hunter-gatherers were capable of feeding enough people to build stone temples. That means they were building wood temples thousands of years before the Natufian villages.

    A systemic breakdown will not return us to the stone age.

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    Quote Originally Posted by goat View Post
    Science is slowly accepting the fact that civilization predates agriculture. We now know that hunter-gatherers were capable of feeding enough people to build stone temples. That means they were building wood temples thousands of years before the Natufian villages.

    A systemic breakdown will not return us to the stone age.
    I'm not sure what your point is. In N. America there are remains of stone cairns built by nomadic hunters that were used to force herds of game over cliffs. More than one tribe would come together for great hunts that slaughtered thousands of animals, then disperse again. There are stone remains of fire pits spread over large areas, where once again the nomadic ppl came together for (speculated) festivals, trade, marriage arrangements, probably worship as well. Such things exist all over the world, where time and weather haven't erased them.
    “Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.” -- Gandhi

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    Quote Originally Posted by ThatOwlWoman View Post
    I'm not sure what your point is. In N. America there are remains of stone cairns built by nomadic hunters that were used to force herds of game over cliffs. More than one tribe would come together for great hunts that slaughtered thousands of animals, then disperse again. There are stone remains of fire pits spread over large areas, where once again the nomadic ppl came together for (speculated) festivals, trade, marriage arrangements, probably worship as well. Such things exist all over the world, where time and weather haven't erased them.
    My point is tribes would come together for great hunts more than 17,000 years ago and use this time to feast, trade, and worship. I cited the Natufian villages because of the vast amount of evidence compared to the Americas. We agree that archaeology in the Americas need to look deeper than the Clovis period.

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    Potbelly Hill is the english translation of Göbekli Tepe. Archaeology ignored this sight even though it was filled in with stone chips, a sure sign of megalithic structures, proving that archaeologists prefer hearsay instead of looking for evidence. Thankfully Klaus Schmidt wasn't chasing gold when he decided to go look at the sight. What Schmidt discovered was the dawn of civilization.

    Potbelly Hill proves that civilization came before agriculture and livestock, forcing science to rethink human history, and once again verifying the importance of grasslands in human development. The Fertile Crescent had plenty of food allowing hunter-gatherers to give up their nomadic lifestyle and settle down long enough to build 22 acres of megalithic pillars with high-relief carvings.

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    None of my religion, philosophy, and ethics friends want to talk about the dawn of civilization. Passing up the obvious evidence at Potbelly Hill calls into question if archaeology is a science or a hunt for gold. Why did archaeology stop digging once they reached the Clovis layer? Finding humans in north America prior to Beringia would be embarrassing, yet there's evidence of humans here in San Diego from 130,000 years ago. Humans were in San Diego before they were in Europe or Australia.

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    New Evidence Supports Controversial Claim of Humans in The Americas 130,000 Years Ago
    CARLY CASSELLA11 DECEMBER 2020

    Three years ago, a team of archaeologists in the United States proposed an extraordinary idea: the first human settlers in the Americas arrived at least 100,000 years earlier than we thought.

    The evidence came from a collection of mastodon bones and ancient stones dating back to around 130,000 years ago, which appeared to have been hammered and scraped by early humans.

    The remains were found in the suburbs of San Diego in the 1990s, and the researchers think that the nearby stones may have been used as hammers and anvils to work on the bones. But outside of that, no other traces of human activity were found.

    https://www.sciencealert.com/mastodo...ers-in-america

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    Quote Originally Posted by goat View Post
    Natufian villages predate agriculture by 5000 years. Humans were building stone structures to gather for worship and festivals at least 15,000 years ago. That required separate villages to cooperate for a common goal. There had to be a strong and knowledgeable leader to convince these villages to work together. Woolly mammoths and saber-toothed tigers were still roaming the earth.

    The only evidence of trade is human nature. We're always looking for a way to make life easier, so our first stone temples were also a place for commerce, or do I have it backwards? Either way people came from all over to feast and trade at a church. There was no controlling centralized government forcing people to do what we've always done. Systemic collapse may be the cure we need.
    The whole point of having an Age of Reason is that we can now try to persuade people to avoid bringing on a systemic collapse.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gin Saké View Post
    The whole point of having an Age of Reason is that we can now try to persuade people to avoid bringing on a systemic collapse.
    Every system has to evolve or die. Power will never give up power, that's why they've militarized the police. We don't know when the markets will crash again but we know it's coming soon. The Natufian villages cooperated to build their own system but we know the states are way too divided for that.

    What do you think about humans eating mastodons in San Diego 130,000 years ago?

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    Quote Originally Posted by goat View Post
    New Evidence Supports Controversial Claim of Humans in The Americas 130,000 Years Ago
    CARLY CASSELLA11 DECEMBER 2020

    Three years ago, a team of archaeologists in the United States proposed an extraordinary idea: the first human settlers in the Americas arrived at least 100,000 years earlier than we thought.

    The evidence came from a collection of mastodon bones and ancient stones dating back to around 130,000 years ago, which appeared to have been hammered and scraped by early humans.

    The remains were found in the suburbs of San Diego in the 1990s, and the researchers think that the nearby stones may have been used as hammers and anvils to work on the bones. But outside of that, no other traces of human activity were found.

    https://www.sciencealert.com/mastodo...ers-in-america
    Interesting. It sounds as though the discovery site was found long ago, so there's no way to accurately date the objects found in it since they were removed.
    “Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.” -- Gandhi

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    Quote Originally Posted by ThatOwlWoman View Post
    Interesting. It sounds as though the discovery site was found long ago, so there's no way to accurately date the objects found in it since they were removed.
    Tom Deméré and his team waited until they were sure they had evidence of humans in north America from 130,000 years ago before they wrote their peer review paper. They knew they would be laughed at by the very conservative science community.

    Science used to believe that agriculture and livestock allowed for civilizations to become large enough for people to build megalithic structures but Potbelly Hill proves that hunter-gatherers had plenty of food to build 22-acres of temples to meet up for festivals.

    I'm all about going against traditional thinking. Wait to I get around to the big bang.

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    Quote Originally Posted by goat View Post
    Tom Deméré and his team waited until they were sure they had evidence of humans in north America from 130,000 years ago before they wrote their peer review paper. They knew they would be laughed at by the very conservative science community.

    Science used to believe that agriculture and livestock allowed for civilizations to become large enough for people to build megalithic structures but Potbelly Hill proves that hunter-gatherers had plenty of food to build 22-acres of temples to meet up for festivals.

    I'm all about going against traditional thinking. Wait to I get around to the big bang.
    Does the Big Bang end with a Big Crush?

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    "The Big Crunch scenario hypothesized that the density of matter throughout the universe is sufficiently high that gravitational attraction will overcome the expansion which began with the Big Bang. The FLRW cosmology can predict whether the expansion will eventually stop based on the average energy density, Hubble parameter, and cosmological constant. If the metric expansion stopped, then contraction will inevitably follow, accelerating as time passes and finishing the universe in a kind of gravitational collapse."
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Crunch

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack View Post
    Does the Big Bang end with a Big Crush?
    Big crush as in supernova?

    I believe big bangs are common and therefore universes are also common. There are countless planets and stars, so why would there only be one universe?

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