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Thread: IT IS NO LONGER COOL TO CALL THE INSANE & CRAZY MF'S HERE CRAZY & INSANE!!

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    Werewolf IT IS NO LONGER COOL TO CALL THE INSANE & CRAZY MF'S HERE CRAZY & INSANE!!

    Crazy ppl have feelings to & I think we should all refrain from calling the crazy MF's here crazy


    Why People Are Rethinking The Words 'Crazy' And 'Insane' (AUDIO)


    The word "retarded" (NOT on political message boards) has fallen out of use as sensitivity to the disabled has grown. Now, a similar dynamic is beginning to play out around the word "crazy" and those with mental illness.

    ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

    We're about to discuss sensitive words and why we decide to stop using them. For example, one word used to be a standard schoolyard insult. We would not say it today without this warning first. It is the word retarded. Now some people say the words crazy and insane should fall into the same category. This came up recently when our reporter NPR's Neda Ulaby was chatting with a friend.

    NEDA ULABY, BYLINE: My friend and I were talking about something. I don't really remember what. And she said...

    ZARENA ASLAMI: It is so crazy (laughter).

    ULABY: I called my friend Zarena Aslami to reconstruct our conversation because she did something then that surprised me.

    ASLAMI: And then I stopped myself, and I was like, oh, you know, I'm trying not to use that word to describe negative situations.

    ULABY: Much in the way that many people now avoid using the word retarded. This reckoning with the word crazy began similarly among disability activists and is trickling into the mainstream. Azza Altiraifi researches disability justice issues at the Center for American Progress. Crazy might seem harmless, she says, but she thinks giving negative value to crazy or insane contributes to marginalizing people.

    AZZA ALTIRAIFI: One in 5 Americans at least have lived - are experiencing mental illness. And of those people, we're talking about your neighbors. We are talking about family members. We are talking about people in your community.

    ULABY: People at higher risk to be hurt, homeless and discriminated against. But isn't not using the word crazy a little bit, well, crazy?

    (SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CRAZY EX-GIRLFRIEND THEME SONG")

    UNIDENTIFIED ACTORS: (As characters, singing) She's the crazy ex-girlfriend.

    RACHEL BLOOM: (As Rebecca Bunch) What? No, I'm not.

    UNIDENTIFIED ACTORS: (As characters, singing) She's the crazy ex-girlfriend.

    BLOOM: (As Rebecca Bunch) That's a sexist term.

    ULABY: Rachel Bloom created and starred in the TV show "Crazy Ex-Girlfriend." It's widely respected among disability activists because of its depiction of a lead character with mental illness. Bloom thinks it's completely fine if people want to stop saying crazy.

    BLOOM: That makes sense. I get it. It's a really, really complicated word. It's - it has so many meanings. It's - I think for me it's still contextual.

    ULABY: Obviously there's no language police that'll force people to stop saying this word. It's an individual choice, says Zarena Aslami.

    ASLAMI: I miss the word sometimes.

    ULABY: But she's embracing not saying it as an intellectual challenge as well as a chance to be more thoughtful.

    ASLAMI: And as, you know, an English professor, I also felt the burden of, like, well, you know, I should be able to be more specific. When I say something's really crazy, what do I really mean? Like, it's really stressful. It's really busy. But as you and I talked about, those words don't really have the force of saying, like, something is insane.

    ULABY: It might feel unrealistic to lose words with such force. I asked Azza Altiraifi what she would say to the people who are rolling their eyes right now at the notion of rethinking crazy.

    ALTIRAIFI: What it tells people like me is that my life is not worth that adjustment. And if that is where people are, then it's really no surprise that people living with mental illness face such disproportionately high levels of violence and harm.

    ULABY: Language is living, she says, and using language that brings more dignity to people with mental illnesses maybe not such a strange idea after all. Neda Ulaby, NPR News.

    It is really sad that some in our country have more trust & respect for foreign adversarial leaders than our own loyal opposition.

    “But I suppose the most revolutionary act one can engage in is... to tell the truth.”
    ― Howard Zinn

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    I draw a distinction.

    Referring to ideas and describing people are two different things.

    It is not respectful to call people names or derogatory labels.

    But their ideas and the things they say are a different matter.
    Personal Ignore Policy PIP: I like civil discourse. I will give you all the respect in the world if you respect me. Flame on me, mouth off to me, or express overt racism, you go on my PERMANENT Ignore List. Zero tolerance. No exceptions. I won't participate in your threads, you will be banned from mine. ... Ignore the shallow. Cherish the thoughtful. Long Live Civil Discourse, Mutual Respect, and Good Debate! ps: if you like my PIP, feel free to use it. It works well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill View Post
    Crazy ppl have feelings to & I think we should all refrain from calling the crazy MF's here crazy


    Why People Are Rethinking The Words 'Crazy' And 'Insane' (AUDIO)


    The word "retarded" (NOT on political message boards) has fallen out of use as sensitivity to the disabled has grown. Now, a similar dynamic is beginning to play out around the word "crazy" and those with mental illness.

    ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

    We're about to discuss sensitive words and why we decide to stop using them. For example, one word used to be a standard schoolyard insult. We would not say it today without this warning first. It is the word retarded. Now some people say the words crazy and insane should fall into the same category. This came up recently when our reporter NPR's Neda Ulaby was chatting with a friend.

    NEDA ULABY, BYLINE: My friend and I were talking about something. I don't really remember what. And she said...

    ZARENA ASLAMI: It is so crazy (laughter).

    ULABY: I called my friend Zarena Aslami to reconstruct our conversation because she did something then that surprised me.

    ASLAMI: And then I stopped myself, and I was like, oh, you know, I'm trying not to use that word to describe negative situations.

    ULABY: Much in the way that many people now avoid using the word retarded. This reckoning with the word crazy began similarly among disability activists and is trickling into the mainstream. Azza Altiraifi researches disability justice issues at the Center for American Progress. Crazy might seem harmless, she says, but she thinks giving negative value to crazy or insane contributes to marginalizing people.

    AZZA ALTIRAIFI: One in 5 Americans at least have lived - are experiencing mental illness. And of those people, we're talking about your neighbors. We are talking about family members. We are talking about people in your community.

    ULABY: People at higher risk to be hurt, homeless and discriminated against. But isn't not using the word crazy a little bit, well, crazy?

    (SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CRAZY EX-GIRLFRIEND THEME SONG")

    UNIDENTIFIED ACTORS: (As characters, singing) She's the crazy ex-girlfriend.

    RACHEL BLOOM: (As Rebecca Bunch) What? No, I'm not.

    UNIDENTIFIED ACTORS: (As characters, singing) She's the crazy ex-girlfriend.

    BLOOM: (As Rebecca Bunch) That's a sexist term.

    ULABY: Rachel Bloom created and starred in the TV show "Crazy Ex-Girlfriend." It's widely respected among disability activists because of its depiction of a lead character with mental illness. Bloom thinks it's completely fine if people want to stop saying crazy.

    BLOOM: That makes sense. I get it. It's a really, really complicated word. It's - it has so many meanings. It's - I think for me it's still contextual.

    ULABY: Obviously there's no language police that'll force people to stop saying this word. It's an individual choice, says Zarena Aslami.

    ASLAMI: I miss the word sometimes.

    ULABY: But she's embracing not saying it as an intellectual challenge as well as a chance to be more thoughtful.

    ASLAMI: And as, you know, an English professor, I also felt the burden of, like, well, you know, I should be able to be more specific. When I say something's really crazy, what do I really mean? Like, it's really stressful. It's really busy. But as you and I talked about, those words don't really have the force of saying, like, something is insane.

    ULABY: It might feel unrealistic to lose words with such force. I asked Azza Altiraifi what she would say to the people who are rolling their eyes right now at the notion of rethinking crazy.

    ALTIRAIFI: What it tells people like me is that my life is not worth that adjustment. And if that is where people are, then it's really no surprise that people living with mental illness face such disproportionately high levels of violence and harm.

    ULABY: Language is living, she says, and using language that brings more dignity to people with mental illnesses maybe not such a strange idea after all. Neda Ulaby, NPR News.
    Does that mean,I can't listen to Patsy Cline sing
    Crazy?
    Margot

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jackie Johnston View Post
    Does that mean,I can't listen to Patsy Cline sing
    Crazy?
    No, but when she sings the "C" word you must hear "special needs"..
    Special needs
    I'm special needs for feelin' so lonely
    I'm special needs
    special needs for feelin' so-o blue-ue

    (takes some practice)




    It is really sad that some in our country have more trust & respect for foreign adversarial leaders than our own loyal opposition.

    “But I suppose the most revolutionary act one can engage in is... to tell the truth.”
    ― Howard Zinn

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    Quote Originally Posted by PoliTalker View Post
    I draw a distinction.

    Referring to ideas and describing people are two different things.

    It is not respectful to call people names or derogatory labels.

    But their ideas and the things they say are a different matter.
    The "C" word has like 50+/- different meanings & there are far worse things to call ppl, hell, it aint even a four letter word.. lol

    It is really sad that some in our country have more trust & respect for foreign adversarial leaders than our own loyal opposition.

    “But I suppose the most revolutionary act one can engage in is... to tell the truth.”
    ― Howard Zinn

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    It's perfectly acceptable to call Grind, Billy, WM, myself, and Mott crazy. For psychopaths such as Daesh, it might be controversial to use an understated term, such as crazy.
    DRINK MOR KOFFEE


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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill View Post
    No, but when she sings the "C" word you must hear "special needs"..
    Special needs
    I'm special needs for feelin' so lonely
    I'm special needs
    special needs for feelin' so-o blue-ue

    (takes some practice)


    The C-word usually isn't Crazy!And I promised Phantasmal,I wouldn't use the C-word
    Margot

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    Bill, those terms well apply to the far right.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jackie Johnston View Post
    The C-word usually isn't Crazy!And I promised Phantasmal,I wouldn't use the C-word
    there is more than one use for the big "C"........

    Good, more should make that promise..........

    It is really sad that some in our country have more trust & respect for foreign adversarial leaders than our own loyal opposition.

    “But I suppose the most revolutionary act one can engage in is... to tell the truth.”
    ― Howard Zinn

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill View Post
    Crazy ppl have feelings to & I think we should all refrain from calling the crazy MF's here crazy


    Why People Are Rethinking The Words 'Crazy' And 'Insane' (AUDIO)


    The word "retarded" (NOT on political message boards) has fallen out of use as sensitivity to the disabled has grown. Now, a similar dynamic is beginning to play out around the word "crazy" and those with mental illness.

    ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

    We're about to discuss sensitive words and why we decide to stop using them. For example, one word used to be a standard schoolyard insult. We would not say it today without this warning first. It is the word retarded. Now some people say the words crazy and insane should fall into the same category. This came up recently when our reporter NPR's Neda Ulaby was chatting with a friend.

    NEDA ULABY, BYLINE: My friend and I were talking about something. I don't really remember what. And she said...

    ZARENA ASLAMI: It is so crazy (laughter).

    ULABY: I called my friend Zarena Aslami to reconstruct our conversation because she did something then that surprised me.

    ASLAMI: And then I stopped myself, and I was like, oh, you know, I'm trying not to use that word to describe negative situations.

    ULABY: Much in the way that many people now avoid using the word retarded. This reckoning with the word crazy began similarly among disability activists and is trickling into the mainstream. Azza Altiraifi researches disability justice issues at the Center for American Progress. Crazy might seem harmless, she says, but she thinks giving negative value to crazy or insane contributes to marginalizing people.

    AZZA ALTIRAIFI: One in 5 Americans at least have lived - are experiencing mental illness. And of those people, we're talking about your neighbors. We are talking about family members. We are talking about people in your community.

    ULABY: People at higher risk to be hurt, homeless and discriminated against. But isn't not using the word crazy a little bit, well, crazy?

    (SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CRAZY EX-GIRLFRIEND THEME SONG")

    UNIDENTIFIED ACTORS: (As characters, singing) She's the crazy ex-girlfriend.

    RACHEL BLOOM: (As Rebecca Bunch) What? No, I'm not.

    UNIDENTIFIED ACTORS: (As characters, singing) She's the crazy ex-girlfriend.

    BLOOM: (As Rebecca Bunch) That's a sexist term.

    ULABY: Rachel Bloom created and starred in the TV show "Crazy Ex-Girlfriend." It's widely respected among disability activists because of its depiction of a lead character with mental illness. Bloom thinks it's completely fine if people want to stop saying crazy.

    BLOOM: That makes sense. I get it. It's a really, really complicated word. It's - it has so many meanings. It's - I think for me it's still contextual.

    ULABY: Obviously there's no language police that'll force people to stop saying this word. It's an individual choice, says Zarena Aslami.

    ASLAMI: I miss the word sometimes.

    ULABY: But she's embracing not saying it as an intellectual challenge as well as a chance to be more thoughtful.

    ASLAMI: And as, you know, an English professor, I also felt the burden of, like, well, you know, I should be able to be more specific. When I say something's really crazy, what do I really mean? Like, it's really stressful. It's really busy. But as you and I talked about, those words don't really have the force of saying, like, something is insane.

    ULABY: It might feel unrealistic to lose words with such force. I asked Azza Altiraifi what she would say to the people who are rolling their eyes right now at the notion of rethinking crazy.

    ALTIRAIFI: What it tells people like me is that my life is not worth that adjustment. And if that is where people are, then it's really no surprise that people living with mental illness face such disproportionately high levels of violence and harm.

    ULABY: Language is living, she says, and using language that brings more dignity to people with mental illnesses maybe not such a strange idea after all. Neda Ulaby, NPR News.
    Many people on this board would qualify as being crazy, or mentally ill, and I will call them as such. I don't think the mental community cares, it's all the people on the outside getting sensitive. I for one, as part of it myself don't get it. The term retarded is slightly different though, and I like to use the term fucktard instead. Retard doesn't fit them, because it's their fault, and not a disability.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill View Post
    Crazy ppl have feelings to & I think we should all refrain from calling the crazy MF's here crazy


    Why People Are Rethinking The Words 'Crazy' And 'Insane' (AUDIO)


    The word "retarded" (NOT on political message boards) has fallen out of use as sensitivity to the disabled has grown. Now, a similar dynamic is beginning to play out around the word "crazy" and those with mental illness
    As native speakers of the English language, we should be able to do better than a boring, mediocre word like "crazy".

    I have always been partial to deranged, demented, loopy, half-baked, unhinged, daft.

    The problem is, when you get down to the level of a Trump-loving trailer park, a Trump rally, a NASCAR race, a lot of people only have a grasp of about 300 words of English.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cypress View Post
    As native speakers of the English language, we should be able to do better than a boring, mediocre word like "crazy".

    I have always been partial to deranged, demented, loopy, half-baked, unhinged, daft.

    The problem is, when you get down to the level of a Trump-loving trailer park, a Trump rally, a NASCAR race, a lot of people only have a grasp of about 300 words of English.
    LMAOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO OOOOOOOOOOOOO

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    Quote Originally Posted by TTQ64 View Post
    LMAOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO OOOOOOOOOOOOO
    It must makes a gigantic thud as it hits the ground!
    In rejecting their view [Spinoza, Leibnitz and Hegel], as I shall contend that we must, we are committing ourselves to the opinion that “truth” in empirical material has a meaning different from that which it bears in logic and mathematics.”

    Bertrand Russell, “An Inquiry Into Meaning & Truth” (1940)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cypress View Post
    As native speakers of the English language, we should be able to do better than a boring, mediocre word like "crazy".

    I have always been partial to deranged, demented, loopy, half-baked, unhinged, daft.

    The problem is, when you get down to the level of a Trump-loving trailer park, a Trump rally, a NASCAR race, a lot of people only have a grasp of about 300 words of English.
    There's only word you know, boy. Wanna guess what it is?

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