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Thread: Dukkha is more than suffering.

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    Default Dukkha is more than suffering.

    Life is suffering. The truth of suffering.

    You've heard these statements of the Buddha about the nature of this life. Over the past one hundred years, much of the Buddha's teachings have made their way into Western thought and culture. Knowing that all of the Buddha's teachings revolve around the four noble truths, we should be sure to come to a correct understanding about what he meant when he laid out his foundational teachings.

    In his first sermon, the Buddha taught:

    Now this, bhikkhus, is the noble truth of dukkha: birth is dukkha, aging is dukkha, illness is dukkha, death is dukkha; union with what is displeasing is dukkha; separation from what is pleasing is dukkha; not to get what one wants is dukkha; in brief, the five aggregates subject to clinging are dukkha.

    It is easy to see how the early translators of the dharma may have chosen suffering or pain as a substitute for the Sanskrit term dukkha. It makes sense, birth is painful, aging is suffering, not getting what you want is painful. Those translations offer insight into what the Buddha was trying to convey.

    But words are limited in their meaning.

    The Buddha first states that birth, aging, illness and death are all dukkha. Every stage of human life is dukkha. The human condition is subject to pain and suffering, discomfort and unease.

    The Buddha then says that uniting with what is displeasing is dukkha. It is unsatisfying, frustrating, miserable.

    Next we find that separation from what is pleasing is dukkha. It is grief, sadness, distress.

    The Buddha goes on to say that not getting what one wants is dukkha. It is despair, disappointing, upsetting.

    Finally, the Buddha states that the five aggregates, or all conditioned phenomena, are dukkha. There is a basic unsatisfactoriness that pervades all forms of the human condition, which is subject to change, impermanent and without any lasting substance. That which changes, is impermanent and without lasting substance is incapable of satisfying us.

    Later in his first discourse, the Buddha taught that dukkha was to be fully understood. What are we to understand? Is it enough to understand that life is suffering?

    We need to understand the human condition in its entirety. The central tenet of the Buddha's teachings is that we need to understand our own pain and suffering, but also the myriad ways in which we fall into states of loss and sadness, dissatisfaction and despair. We need to fully understand how all things change, how the very nature of this life and this world is that it is impermanent and without any lasting substance.

    Dukkha includes understanding suffering, but it is much more than suffering. It is understanding the human condition, and all that it entails.

    Finally, we should take a look at what is meant by 'understand'. Is it to be known, acknowledged or perceived?

    It is not enough to know the words or even the meaning. To fully understand dukkha we have to be aware of dukkha, acknowledge it, feel it and sit with it. We need to see it and listen to it. We need to fight the urge to wallow in it, push it away or pretend it isn't there. Then we might understand the truth of dukkha.
    http://siddhearta.blogspot.com/2018/...suffering.html

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    I didn't read all that. But Buddhist girls like to fuck, I know that. I think it's because they aren't saddled with all that Middle Eastern (Abrahamic) religious stuff.
    (Havana Moon seems knowledgeable on the Subject, I wonder what his thoughts are?)

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    ^ it's not that much to read. life us dukkha -the human condition. It's the basis of the 4 Nobel Truths.

    In the fourth truth the Buddha taught that the way to get rid of the desire that causes suffering is to free yourself from being attached to it.
    The Eightfold Path is a set of guidelines for Buddhists to live by that should lead to the end of suffering.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dukkha View Post
    ^ it's not that much to read. life us dukkha -the human condition. It's the basis of the 4 Nobel Truths.

    In the fourth truth the Buddha taught that the way to get rid of the desire that causes suffering is to free yourself from being attached to it.
    The Eightfold Path is a set of guidelines for Buddhists to live by that should lead to the end of suffering.
    That's uh, that's uh ... interesting. But ...
    I've contacted Havana Moon on the subject of 'Why Buddhist Girls Love to Fuck'. This could tie in with your 'suffering' thesis here.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack View Post
    That's uh, that's uh ... interesting. But ...
    I've contacted Havana Moon on the subject of 'Why Buddhist Girls Love to Fuck'. This could tie in with your 'suffering' thesis here.
    there are times to be a class clown, there are other times for awareness.
    as the title directly says, dukka is more then suffering

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    Quote Originally Posted by dukkha View Post
    there are times to be a class clown, there are other times for awareness.
    as the title directly says, dukka is more then suffering
    OK. Thanks. Maybe when I get my coffee and have more time, I will read it and give you my thoughts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack View Post
    OK. Thanks. Maybe when I get my coffee and have more time, I will read it and give you my thoughts.
    only if you are interested, do it for yourself, not for me; but yes read it when you are more contemplative

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    What is the The Most Wonderful Thing in the world?
    Yamaraja asked Emperor Yudhisthira, ‘What is the most wonderful thing within this world?’

    Mahārāja Yudhisthira replied (Mahabharata, Vana-parva 313.116):
    “Hundreds and thousands of living entities meet death at every moment,
    but a foolish living being nonetheless thinks himself deathless and does
    not prepare for death. This is the most wonderful thing in this world.”


    Commentary by A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami:
    Everyone has to die because everyone is fully under the control of material nature,
    yet everyone thinks that he is independent, that whatever he likes he can do, that
    he will never meet death but live forever, and so on. So-called scientists are making
    various plans by which living entities in the future can live forever, but while they are
    thus pursuing such scientific knowledge, Yamaraja, in due course of time, will take them away from their business of so-called research.

    Every minute and every second we experience that living entities are going to the
    temple of death. Men, insects, animals, birds—everyone is going. This world, therefore,
    is called mrityuloka—the planet of death. Every day there are obituaries, and if we
    bother to go to the cemetery or crematorium grounds we can validate them.
    Yet everyone is thinking, “Somehow or other I’ll live.” Everyone is subject to the law of death,
    yet no one takes it seriously. This is illusion. Thinking we will live forever, we go on
    doing whatever we like, feeling that we will never be held responsible. This is a very risky life,
    and it is the densest part of illusion. We should become very serious and understand that
    death is waiting. We have heard the expression, “as sure as death.” This means that in this
    world death is the most certain thing; no one can avoid it. When death comes, no longer will
    our puffed-up philosophy or advanced degrees help us. At that time our stout and strong
    body and our intelligence—which don’t care for anything—are vanquished. At that time the
    fragmental portion (jīvātmā) comes under the dictation of material nature, and prakṛti (nature)
    gives us the type of body for which we are fit. If we want to take this risk, we can avoid Krishna;
    if we don’t want to take it, Krishna will come to help us.




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    Quote Originally Posted by dukkha View Post
    only if you are interested, do it for yourself, not for me; but yes read it when you are more contemplative
    OK dukkha, I read it. I don't think that applies to me. I'm not suffering. I like the Philosophy of Epicurus.

    "Epicureanism is a system of philosophy based on the teachings of Epicurus, founded around 307 B.C. It teaches that the greatest good is to seek modest pleasures in order to attain a state of tranquillity, freedom from fear ("ataraxia") and absence from bodily pain ("aponia"). This combination of states is held to constitute happiness in its highest form, and so Epicureanism can be considered a form of Hedonism, although it differs in its conception of happiness as the absence of pain, and in its advocacy of a simple life."
    https://www.philosophybasics.com/bra...cureanism.html


    Thomas Jefferson; 'Life, liberty, and the ----->Pursuit of Happiness<-----'
    "A number of possible sources or inspirations for Jefferson's use of the phrase in the Declaration of Independence have been identified, although scholars debate the extent to which any one of them actually influenced Jefferson. Jefferson declared himself an Epicurean during his lifetime: this is a philosophical doctrine that teaches the pursuit of happiness, here meaning "prosperity, thriving, wellbeing",[7][8] and proposes autarchy, which translates as self-rule, self-sufficiency or freedom. The greatest disagreement comes between those who suggest the phrase was drawn from John Locke and those who identify some other source."
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life,_...t_of_Happiness

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    Quote Originally Posted by dukkha View Post
    Life is suffering. The truth of suffering.

    You've heard these statements of the Buddha about the nature of this life. Over the past one hundred years, much of the Buddha's teachings have made their way into Western thought and culture. Knowing that all of the Buddha's teachings revolve around the four noble truths, we should be sure to come to a correct understanding about what he meant when he laid out his foundational teachings.

    In his first sermon, the Buddha taught:

    Now this, bhikkhus, is the noble truth of dukkha: birth is dukkha, aging is dukkha, illness is dukkha, death is dukkha; union with what is displeasing is dukkha; separation from what is pleasing is dukkha; not to get what one wants is dukkha; in brief, the five aggregates subject to clinging are dukkha.

    It is easy to see how the early translators of the dharma may have chosen suffering or pain as a substitute for the Sanskrit term dukkha. It makes sense, birth is painful, aging is suffering, not getting what you want is painful. Those translations offer insight into what the Buddha was trying to convey.

    But words are limited in their meaning.

    The Buddha first states that birth, aging, illness and death are all dukkha. Every stage of human life is dukkha. The human condition is subject to pain and suffering, discomfort and unease.

    The Buddha then says that uniting with what is displeasing is dukkha. It is unsatisfying, frustrating, miserable.

    Next we find that separation from what is pleasing is dukkha. It is grief, sadness, distress.

    The Buddha goes on to say that not getting what one wants is dukkha. It is despair, disappointing, upsetting.

    Finally, the Buddha states that the five aggregates, or all conditioned phenomena, are dukkha. There is a basic unsatisfactoriness that pervades all forms of the human condition, which is subject to change, impermanent and without any lasting substance. That which changes, is impermanent and without lasting substance is incapable of satisfying us.

    Later in his first discourse, the Buddha taught that dukkha was to be fully understood. What are we to understand? Is it enough to understand that life is suffering?

    We need to understand the human condition in its entirety. The central tenet of the Buddha's teachings is that we need to understand our own pain and suffering, but also the myriad ways in which we fall into states of loss and sadness, dissatisfaction and despair. We need to fully understand how all things change, how the very nature of this life and this world is that it is impermanent and without any lasting substance.

    Dukkha includes understanding suffering, but it is much more than suffering. It is understanding the human condition, and all that it entails.

    Finally, we should take a look at what is meant by 'understand'. Is it to be known, acknowledged or perceived?

    It is not enough to know the words or even the meaning. To fully understand dukkha we have to be aware of dukkha, acknowledge it, feel it and sit with it. We need to see it and listen to it. We need to fight the urge to wallow in it, push it away or pretend it isn't there. Then we might understand the truth of dukkha.
    http://siddhearta.blogspot.com/2018/...suffering.html
    I thought you Trump supporters were Evangelical fake Christians?
    Melchizedek

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    If you are into Idolatry...….

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    Quote Originally Posted by MASON View Post
    I thought
    No you didn't.
    Liberalism always generates the exact opposite of its stated intent

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    Quote Originally Posted by countryboy View Post
    No
    No.

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    Interesting thread. Many of my age cohort when I was in my teens and 20s were attracted to Buddhism. Like most new converts to something they were kind of preachy and enthusiastic. In order not to offend I read their handouts and studied a bit more on my own as well (this was in pre-Internet days). I found the nihilism and focus on suffering not for me. There seems more of a disconnect between reality, the physical world, and other beings than even Xtians have.

    What brought you to this belief system, and what keeps you? No sarcasm. Only a desire to learn.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ThatOwlWoman View Post
    Interesting thread. Many of my age cohort when I was in my teens and 20s were attracted to Buddhism. Like most new converts to something they were kind of preachy and enthusiastic. In order not to offend I read their handouts and studied a bit more on my own as well (this was in pre-Internet days). I found the nihilism and focus on suffering not for me. There seems more of a disconnect between reality, the physical world, and other beings than even Xtians have.

    What brought you to this belief system, and what keeps you? No sarcasm. Only a desire to learn.
    It;s not nihilism. It's a clear eyed understanding that no matter who you are, and what your station in life you will experience dukka.
    The 4 Noble Truths lay that out - the Eightfold Noble path is an answer.

    So when the suffering of age. death, poverty, disease or just loss of attachments like love and money -you can put into a perspective. The Buddhist maxim is "everything is impermanent" even the moon and the stars will end.
    So when you lose your attachments, you won't suffer by trying to cling to impermanent things.
    The clinging to attachments is what causes the suffering - you want it back, or you want what you don't have

    The moral sphere of the Path leads to Enlightenment, enlightenment is like the flame above the candle
    not tied to anything physical - pure reason . It's hard to do an overview, but the more you study the more you learn every aspect of the human condition .knowledge of what you are going thru helps you cope with it

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