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Thread: Astronomers get glimpse at the very beginning of time

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    Default Astronomers get glimpse at the very beginning of time

    Scientists have peered at the very beginning of the universe, sampling light that was emitted at the dawn of time.

    And the breakthrough is the consequence of a happy accident: a galaxy acted as a huge space telescope, bending light so that we could see deep into space and time.

    The light that reached Earth was among the first to ever twinkle on after the Big Bang.


    Astronomers now hope they are able to make yet more similar discoveries, allowing them to watch as the universe began.


    The observations allowed scientists to pick up part of an extremely distant quasar, sending out a beam of light that is almost as old as the universe itself.




    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/s...-a8720016.html
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    I have this feeling that 'time' pulsates with the Big Bang and the Big Crunch.

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    Quote Originally Posted by guno View Post
    Scientists have peered at the very beginning of the universe, sampling light that was emitted at the dawn of time.

    And the breakthrough is the consequence of a happy accident: a galaxy acted as a huge space telescope, bending light so that we could see deep into space and time.

    The light that reached Earth was among the first to ever twinkle on after the Big Bang.


    Astronomers now hope they are able to make yet more similar discoveries, allowing them to watch as the universe began.


    The observations allowed scientists to pick up part of an extremely distant quasar, sending out a beam of light that is almost as old as the universe itself.




    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/s...-a8720016.html
    How awesome. Thanks for this post.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack View Post
    I have this feeling that 'time' pulsates with the Big Bang and the Big Crunch.
    And if light moves in a straight line it ends up where it started.

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    Quote Originally Posted by anonymoose View Post
    And if light moves in a straight line it ends up where it started.
    Theoretically.....if Stephen Hawking was right about the universe being more like a balloon with everything on its surface instead of everything being inside the balloon.

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    I thought this thread was going to be about the birth of Ruth Bader Ginsberg.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dark Soul View Post
    I thought this thread was going to be about the birth of Ruth Bader Ginsberg.
    I thought that if you drooled on your keyboard long enough you'd have shorted something out by now.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nomad View Post
    I thought that if you drooled on your keyboard long enough you'd have shorted something out by now.
    Very telling that you think of drooling when I mention RBG.

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    Quote Originally Posted by guno View Post
    Scientists have peered at the very beginning of the universe, sampling light that was emitted at the dawn of time.

    And the breakthrough is the consequence of a happy accident: a galaxy acted as a huge space telescope, bending light so that we could see deep into space and time.

    The light that reached Earth was among the first to ever twinkle on after the Big Bang.


    Astronomers now hope they are able to make yet more similar discoveries, allowing them to watch as the universe began.


    The observations allowed scientists to pick up part of an extremely distant quasar, sending out a beam of light that is almost as old as the universe itself.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/s...-a8720016.html
    Nice work, I am a geek for this kind of stuff.

    The beautiful thing about gravitational lensing is that it is also be used to detect exoplanets around other stars.
    I am telling you, Einstein and his general theory of relatively are paying off in spades, man!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dark Soul View Post
    I thought this thread was going to be about the birth of Ruth Bader Ginsberg.
    Thought we could get a thread without you being a jerk.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dark Soul View Post
    Very telling that you think of drooling when I mention RBG.
    I'm reminded of droolng every time I see your screen name.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ThatOwlWoman View Post
    Much obliged.

    As a struggling undergraduate, I could never understand why Einstein's theory of general relativity predicted that the mass of large bodies, such as stars, could bend light - good grief, photons have no mass!! How on Earth would a gravitational force deflect something that has no mass??!

    Then I had an excellent physics professor who finally explained gravity and relativity in a way I could grasp: Gravity is not actually a "force" in the way Newtonian physics considers it. Rather, in Einstein's relativity it is a curvature of space-time. Simply put, gravity is not a force -- it is geometry, aka a fundamental geometric property of the cosmos.

    Out of about five dozen physicists I have heard try to explain relativity, it took that one guy to explain it in a way that was easy to grasp and was totally intuitive.

    The bottom line: good science teachers are far and few between, and I am convinced that this artificial division between the humanities and the natural sciences needs to be broken down - because most scientists need a crap load more training in writing, communication, and rhetoric!

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    Quote Originally Posted by guno View Post
    Scientists have peered at the very beginning of the universe, sampling light that was emitted at the dawn of time.

    And the breakthrough is the consequence of a happy accident: a galaxy acted as a huge space telescope, bending light so that we could see deep into space and time.

    The light that reached Earth was among the first to ever twinkle on after the Big Bang.


    Astronomers now hope they are able to make yet more similar discoveries, allowing them to watch as the universe began.


    The observations allowed scientists to pick up part of an extremely distant quasar, sending out a beam of light that is almost as old as the universe itself.




    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/s...-a8720016.html
    did God wave?......

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cypress View Post
    Much obliged.

    As a struggling undergraduate, I could never understand why Einstein's theory of general relativity predicted that the mass of large bodies, such as stars, could bend light - good grief, photons have no mass!! How on Earth would a gravitational force deflect something that has no mass??!

    Then I had an excellent physics professor who finally explained gravity and relativity in a way I could grasp: Gravity is not actually a "force" in the way Newtonian physics considers it. Rather, in Einstein's relativity it is a curvature of space-time. Simply put, gravity is not a force -- it is geometry, aka a fundamental geometric property of the cosmos.

    Out of about five dozen physicists I have heard try to explain relativity, it took that one guy to explain it in a way that was easy to grasp and was totally intuitive.

    The bottom line: good science teachers are far and few between, and I am convinced that this artificial division between the humanities and the natural sciences needs to be broken down - because most scientists need a crap load more training in writing, communication, and rhetoric!
    Teachers like that are precious as diamonds, eh?

    I never took physics but Mr. Owl has. He also explained gravity the same way. I think that was one of Stephen Hawking's greatest gifts -- that he could take the most esoteric and complex subjects in human thought and translate them into the-rest-of-us-speak.

    Now I want to go re-read A Brief History of Time.

    Good explanation of gravity lensing:

    https://astronomy.stackexchange.com/...tional-lensing

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